Just peachy…

Grab hold of ’em awesome peaches that are in season right now!

Once you have eaten them in all forms and shapes, try this refreshingly simple recipe

You will need,

2 peaches, diced into smallish pieces

For the dressing

2 inch piece ginger, grated finely
1 tbsp honey
juice from half a lemon
garden fresh mint, if you have on hand

In a bowl mix the dressing first and then add the peaches.

That is it, really!

Chill the salad before serving.

Trust me on a hot Houston afternoon, you would want something cool.

Maxixe- cute little cucumbers!

Brazilian cucumber- a farmer’s (Harvard University ) market buy!

Use them as you would in any salad- mine had carrots, sprouts, cilantro and the star MAXIXE with a minimal lemon-olive oil dressing. Oh and by the way don’t be scared the spiky looking skin- they are harmless.
You can read all about it here

Yotam Ottolenghi ishtyle…

This is a salad inspired by the oh-so-creative New Vegetarian, Yotam Ottolenghi! I love his creative approach to vegetarian recipes.

Ingredients

1½ tbsp cumin seeds
1½ tbsp coriander seeds
1 c  sprouts (whole green gram)
1 c tiny red radish, thinly sliced
1 c carrots, peeled and thinly sliced
1 c thinly sliced baby cucumbers 
1 tbsp dried parsley
1 garlic cloves, crushed
2 tbsp rapeseed oil
2 tbsp red-wine vinegar
2 tbsp cider vinegar
1 tsp salt
juice of half a lemon
2 c romaine lettuce, torn
Black pepper
Method

In a small frying pan, toast the cumin and coriander seeds on high heat for a minute or two, shaking the pan to move the seeds around as you do so, until they give off their aroma and begin to pop. Transfer to a mortar, and crush with a pestle until powdery.

Put the sprouts, radish, cucumber and carrot in a large bowl. Add the parsley, garlic, oils, vinegars, cumin, salt, lemon juice and some black pepper. Stir, taste and adjust the seasoning as necessary. Add the lettuce, toss gently and serve.

Judgement

It tasted green and great. The flavors all were playful- had fun making it and eating it too! The wise guy could not praise me enough. Loved the idea of toasted cumin and coriander, it brought it an unexpected dimension to the salad.

I am sending this off to Torview for the Food Palette series event– first time participating.

Pia is hosting her Innovative salad-cucumber event – I did not know about until she left a comment here- so here this goes to her event too!

Tis the season

for the itsy-bitsy, dainty golden beauties.

  
“I have no hostility to nature, but a child’s love to it. I expand and live in the warm day like corn and melons”- Emerson
The corn season arrives and I let out a sigh of relief. I wait eagerly for these months when I can go out to the store, smell the wet earth on fresh corn and obsess over which one, among the hundreds laid out, I should pick. I love corn- and I love all kinds of it. I am happy with just plain corn (sweet or otherwise) roasted on a stove.
I saw the recipe here– by the way Mark Bittman rocks!
Ingredients

2 tablespoons canola oil
3 ears corn, stripped of their kernels
1 small red onion, chopped
1/2 red bell pepper, cored, seeded, and chopped
1 tsp chilli powder, like ancho
Salt and freshly ground black pepper
1 small can (15oz) black beans
Juice of 2 limes
1/2 cup chopped fresh cilantro leaves

Method

Put the oil in a pan and turn the heat to high. When the oil is very hot but not yet smoking, toss in the corn. Let it sit for a minute or so, then stir or shake the pan; brown the corn a bit, 5 minutes or less, then turn off the heat and stir in the onion, pepper, chile powder, salt, and pepper.

Cool for a few minutes, then toss with the remaining ingredients. Taste, adjust the seasoning, and serve hot, warm, or at room temperature

Judgement

I love corn in any form, if you have missed it the thousand times I have said it before!

  • 2 teaspoons canola oil
  • 1 clove garlic, minced
  • 1 1/2 cups corn kernels (from 3 ears)
  • 1 large ripe mango (about 1 pound), peeled and diced
  • 1 15-ounce or 19-ounce can black beans, rinsed
  • 1/2 cup chopped red onion
  • 1/2 cup diced red bell pepper
  • 3 tablespoons lime juice
  • 1 small canned chipotle pepper in adobo sauce (see Ingredient Note), drained and chopped
  • 1 1/2 tablespoons chopped fresh cilantro
  • 1/4 teaspoon ground cumin
  • 1/4 teaspoon salt
  • 2 teaspoons canola oil
  • 1 clove garlic, minced
  • 1 1/2 cups corn kernels (from 3 ears)
  • 1 large ripe mango (about 1 pound), peeled and diced
  • 1 15-ounce or 19-ounce can black beans, rinsed
  • 1/2 cup chopped red onion
  • 1/2 cup diced red bell pepper
  • 3 tablespoons lime juice
  • 1 small canned chipotle pepper in adobo sauce (see Ingredient Note), drained and chopped
  • 1 1/2 tablespoons chopped fresh cilantro
  • 1/4 teaspoon ground cumin
  • 1/4 teaspoon salt
  • 2 teaspoons canola oil
  • 1 clove garlic, minced
  • 1 1/2 cups corn kernels (from 3 ears)
  • 1 large ripe mango (about 1 pound), peeled and diced
  • 1 15-ounce or 19-ounce can black beans, rinsed
  • 1/2 cup chopped red onion
  • 1/2 cup diced red bell pepper
  • 3 tablespoons lime juice
  • 1 small canned chipotle pepper in adobo sauce (see Ingredient Note), drained and chopped
  • 1 1/2 tablespoons chopped fresh cilantro
  • 1/4 teaspoon ground cumin
  • 1/4 teaspoon salt
  • 2 teaspoons canola oil
  • 1 clove garlic, minced
  • 1 1/2 cups corn kernels (from 3 ears)
  • 1 large ripe mango (about 1 pound), peeled and diced
  • 1 15-ounce or 19-ounce can black beans, rinsed
  • 1/2 cup chopped red onion
  • 1/2 cup diced red bell pepper
  • 3 tablespoons lime juice
  • 1 small canned chipotle pepper in adobo sauce (see Ingredient Note), drained and chopped
  • 1 1/2 tablespoons chopped fresh cilantro
  • 1/4 teaspoon ground cumin
  • 1/4 teaspoon salt
  • And for dessert, we have fresh figs-quark cheese pot– for those days when you crave something sweet

    Kasha salad for health

    I have been wanting to give whole grains a try for a long time now, so when Lisa announced this month’s theme for No Croutons Required I was excited. Here is my entry for this month’s event.
    Greek Kasha Salad (Adapted from here, I have marked the changes made in Red)

    First some introduction to Kasha- It is a porridge commonly eaten in Eastern European countries. A common misconception is that Kasha is buckwheat groats but it is actually a meal made from any ingredient such as wheat, barley and oats. For more information you can check here or here or here!

    KASHA SALAD

    Ingredients

    1 cup dried green lentils (I used whole green moong dal)
    1 bay leaf
    Salt and pepper to taste
    3 tablespoons olive oil, divided
    1/2 cup kasha (I used buckwheat groats)
    1 shallot, thinly sliced
    1 clove garlic, thinly sliced

    1 tsp ginger, minced
    1 cup water, vegetable broth
    3 tablespoons oregano leaves (I used dried)
    1 tomato, chopped
    1/3 cup chopped pitted Kalamata olives
    2 green onions, thinly sliced
    2 tablespoons chopped flat-leaf parsley
    1/3 cup crumbled feta cheese (I used about 1/2 cup)

    Fresh lemon juice (from half a lemon)

    Method

    Pressure cook the lentils in 2 1/2 cups of water (add the bay leaf too) along with some salt and pepepr. Once it is done, discard bay leaf and drain lentils well (I used this liquid in my pasta sauce).

    Meanwhile, heat 1 tablespoon of the oil in a small pot over medium heat. Add kasha, shallots and garlic and cook, stirring occasionally, until shallots are softened. Add the broth and bring to a boil. Reduce heat to medium-low and cook (with the cover on) until water is almost absorbed and kasha is almost tender, about 5 minutes. Add oregano, continue to simmer (again put the cover back on-just so the kasha can get cooked well) until liquid is completely absorbed, 3 to 4 minutes more. Remove from heat and set aside, uncovered, to let cool.

    Put lentils, kasha mixture, tomatoes, olives, green onions, parsley, remaining 2 tablespoons oil, salt and pepper into a large bowl and toss gently to combine. Serve at room temperature with feta cheese and lemon juice.

    Judgement: I loved this salad (Great for a hot summer day)- the kasha was tender and had a bite to it so you could tell it apart from the lentils. Next time I am going to increase the amount of kasha and decrease the amount of lentils (may be try some other lentils).